FREE TREATMENT REPORT

See ratings and reviews when you sign up for an account.

Examining Neurocognitive Profiles of Bipolar Disorder and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

This study is currently Recruiting

April 2010 By National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

First Recieved on August 18, 2009

Last Updated on April 23, 2010

Sponsor: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Collaborators: The State Family Fund
Information provided by: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Identifier: NCT00961935

Purpose

The UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience in Los Angeles, CA, is conducting a study looking at similarities and differences in how the brain works between bipolar disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional

Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:7 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria: - Subject suffers clinically impairing symptoms of mood lability. - Child has resided with primary caretaker for at least 6 months. - Caretaker speaks sufficient English to complete all study evaluations and measures. Exclusion Criteria: - Lifetime history of mental retardation, autism, or primary diagnosis of psychosis. - Subject is pregnant or nursing.

Investigators

  • Investigator: Patricia Walshaw, Ph.D. - Principal Investigator - University of California, Los Angeles

Locations

  • UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior

    Los Angeles, California 90095 United States

advertisement
V2012.311.925.327
Disclaimer: The list and ratings above are for informational purposes only, and is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. The goal of the information is to provide you with a comprehensive view of all available treatments, but should not be construed to indicate that use of any one treatment is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Decisions about use of a new treatment, or about a change in your current treatment plan, should be in consultation with your doctor or other healthcare professional.