Condition: Asthma

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Members in the community range from 2 to 87 years old

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About Asthma

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition that causes restricted airflow between the lungs and airways. An Asthma attack occurs when patients experience a variety of symptoms including wheezing, coughing, gasping, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and sudden bronchospasms, or constriction of the air sacks that allow oxygen to pass through the airways to the lungs and back. Asthma attacks reoccur often even in patients who seek treatment for the condition. At their most severe, Asthma attacks may cause a weak pulse, inflation of the chest, and blue skin and nails due to a lack of oxygen circulating through the lungs. Asthma is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors which may determine the severity and treatment of the condition in patients. A variety of treatments have proven effective in treating asthma, most commonly bronchodilators and steroids. Research has shown that Asthma is an epidemic that affects 300 million people worldwide, with one in 13 people in the United States suffering from the condition. The condition affects all age groups, from infants to seniors. Asthma is 50 percent more likely to strike patients living in poverty. The occurrence of the condition in children is growing rapidly.
Asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition that causes restricted airflow between the lungs and airways. An Asthma attack occurs when patients experience a variety of symptoms including wheezing, coughing, gasping, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and sudden bronchospasms, or constriction of the air sacks that allow oxygen to pass through the airways to the lungs and back. Asthma attacks reoccur often even in patients who seek treatment for the condition. At their most severe, Asthma attacks may cause a weak pulse, inflation of the chest, and blue skin and nails due to a lack of oxygen circulating through the lungs. Asthma is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors which may determine the severity and treatment of the condition in patients. A variety of treatments have proven effective in treating asthma, most commonly bronchodilators and steroids. Research has shown that Asthma is an epidemic that affects 300 million people worldwide, with one in 13 people in the United States suffering from the condition. The condition affects all age groups, from infants to seniors. Asthma is 50 percent more likely to strike patients living in poverty. The occurrence of the condition in children is growing rapidly.
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Read what others are saying about Asthma

sore throat9/12/2015 at 01:25 AM
Was this review helpful? Yes
The need to clear phlegm 9/12/2015 at 01:23 AM
Was this review helpful? Yes
when i have the energy / am foolish enough to try to exercise it usually hurts 5/25/2012 at 07:29 PM
Was this review helpful? Yes
im not sure its related to the asthma5/25/2012 at 07:29 PM
Was this review helpful? Yes
i don't notice the chest tightening until after i realized im having an attack. It takes me a while to realize i've begun to slump over & its hard to breath 5/25/2012 at 07:28 PM
Was this review helpful? Yes

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asthma20
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V2012.311.925.327
Last updated on Jul 20 2018 at 15:38
Disclaimer: The list and ratings above are for informational purposes only, and is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your physician, pharmacist or other healthcare professional. The goal of the information is to provide you with a comprehensive view of all available treatments, but should not be construed to indicate that use of any one treatment is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. Decisions about use of a new treatment, or about a change in your current treatment plan, should be in consultation with your doctor or other healthcare professional.